In Case of Natural Disaster: Preparing Your Dog’s Emergency Care Kit

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Lately it seems like severe weather-related natural disasters are only increasing in frequency and intensity. This is especially true in the northwest, where earthquakes are also a concern. When these events occur, there may be little time to collect any essential items for yourself, let alone your pet. While viral videos of pet rescues may be heartwarming, they don’t represent the unfortunate reality of dealing with some disasters. The best strategy is to prepare well in advance. So in honor of Pet Preparedness Month, we offer this helpful guide to assembling the ultimate emergency dog care kit.

The Emergency Kit Essentials

To assemble a kit that covers your dog’s basic needs, there are a number of basic items that you’ll want to have on hand.

  • Dog meals: Rather than lugging bulky bags or heavy cases of cans, we suggest opting for at least five days’ worth of food that is packaged in individual ready-to-serve pouches, like the full line of Portland Pet Food Company meals, which are shelf-stable for up to two years. 
  • Water: People need clean, potable water, and your dog is the same. Again, be sure to have at least five days worth on hand for everyone. You may also want to get a couple of lightweight and packable Portland Pet Food Company travel bowls
  • Proof of ownership: Put photos of your pet and any related ownership documentation in a resealable plastic bag.
  • Medications & first aid: Aside from any regularly administered medications for your dog, you may also want to get a first aid kit with such items as gauze and cloth tape to bandage an injury, a disinfectant like hydrogen peroxide, and milk of magnesia in case of accidental poisoning.
  • Leash and a pet carrier: A leash is a must-have. We offer one that includes a built-in bottle opener, and there are a number of great options. Because your dog may need to be comfortably contained for hours at a time, a carrier that allows them to stand, turn around and lie down will be very helpful.
  • Vaccination record: While always a good idea, an up-to-date record of your pet’s shots may come in very handy in an emergency situation.
  • ID tag with contact info: Even if your dog has a microchip, the old school method of pet ID will help others contact you quickly in case you are separated from your pet.
  • Waste bags: No matter the situation, being able to dispose of pet waste is always a good idea.

The Nice-to-haves

While not absolutely necessary, there are a number of items that may help your dog cope with a challenging situation.

  • Comfort items: It might be a blanket, dog bed, or a favorite toy, but having a familiar comfort item will help calm your dog in a potentially tense situation.
  • Grooming items: Some dogs find brushing to be very relaxing, and it also helps mitigate shedding.
  • Newspaper and paper towels: You may well have multiple uses for these items.

The Well-prepared-for Dog

Once you have your kit together, it’s not a bad idea to update it as needed to make sure everything’s current. It’s nice peace of mind. After all, your dog is family.

 

 

 

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